North End Beach & Silt Curtains
Established: December 2015 & December 2017

Purpose: To reunite the breach between the north marsh and the rest of the island.  Silt Curtains were used to contain the flow of sedimentation back into the bay.

Substrate: Beneficial dredge material, which is mucky during high tide but has a gently sloping bay to beach access. Silt Curtains (turbidity curtain) are made of woven geotextile fabrics, which floats within mucky silt. 

Wildlife: Foraging endangered species, waders, mixed migratory shorebirds, fin-fish, raptors.

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2020 Report

Established: December 2015 & December 2017

Purpose: To reunite the breach between the north marsh and the rest of the island.  Silt Curtains were used to contain the flow of sedimentation back into the bay.

Substrate: Beneficial dredge material, which is mucky during high tide but has a gently sloping bay to beach access. Silt Curtains (turbidity curtain) are made of woven geotextile fabrics, which floats within mucky silt.

Wildlife: Foraging endangered species, waders, mixed migratory shorebirds, fin-fish, raptors.

2020 Status: This site is a favorite roosting, foraging, and chick feeding location for shorebirds and waders. The beach slope, however, has become flatter, which is creating flooding during higher tides. Vegetative growth is denser inland along the west, but it is still sparse northeast. A deepening cut is forming in the marsh grasses at the north end of the Silt Curtain and the North Marsh boundary.

2019 Report

Established: December 2015 & December 2017

Purpose: Reunite the breach between the north marsh and the rest of the island.  Silt Curtains were used to contain the flow of sedimentation back into the bay.

Substrate: Beneficial dredge material, which is mucky during high tide but has a gently sloping bay to beach access. Silt Curtains (turbidity curtain) are made of woven geotextile fabrics, which floats within mucky silt.

Wildlife: Foraging endangered species, waders, mixed migratory shorebirds, fin-fish, Osprey (perched).

Status: The North Beach slope has become flatter, which is creating higher flooding levels during high tides.  This area is a favorite roosting, foraging, and chick feeding location for many resident and migratory species. A Piping Plover, a federally endangered species, was seen foraging in May.


The IRS  has determined that the Mordecai Land Trust is tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (“Code”) and not a private foundation pursuant to sections 509(a)(1) and 170(b)(1)(A)(vi) of the Code. Mordecai Land Trust was established in 2001.

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